Logic

Overview 

The Logic module helps children develop the ability to analyse objects and events, see their ‘invisible’ sides, identify their most essential characteristics, think sequentially, draw conclusions, and classify and systematize information.

Using Grouping Circles, Classification Trees and Venn Diagrams, as well as substitute shapes to provide visual models of logical concepts, this module offers a distinctive approach to the introduction of two basic logical processes: classification and seriation. It provides an early, coherent introduction to these mental processes in a developmentally appropriate, entertaining and accessible manner.

 

Why are these skills important?

The mental processes required for logical thought are vital but children will not just develop them spontaneously. Adults have no difficulty in classifying, in ordering objects according to the degree to which they possess a given characteristic and in understanding the implications of sequences. For example, if experience or prior knowledge tells us that a train moves more slowly than a plane but faster than a car, then we know we can assume a plane moves faster than both a train and a car.

We make such connections and draw such conclusions so easily that we take the ability for granted. We do, but young children do not. They do not know that a general set must be bigger than the subsets included within it. Thus they may be able to tell us that tulips, roses and carnations are all flowers, and that wasps, bees and butterflies are all insects. But given a group containing many tulips and some roses they will probably not be able to answer the question, “Are there more flowers or more tulips?” They will see a lot of tulips, and say, “More tulips.” This is not just lack of knowledge. Even where children have the prerequisite knowledge, they are unlikely to be able to put it to use, because they have not yet created a coherent mental framework within which to organise what they know. They do not yet grasp even the most obvious features of a classification system.

 

How does this module work?

The Logic module offers a distinctive approach to the introduction of two elements of logical thinking: classification and seriation. What distinguishes the module is the introduction of simple Grouping Circles, Classification Trees and Venn Diagrams. Such diagrams, together with a variety of other visual prompts and external mediators, are used as visual models which help young children to ‘see’ logical concepts and connections without the need for many words. Activities in this module allow the children to analyse objects and events, to identify their essential characteristics and classify them, to think sequentially, and to draw conclusions.

 

The additional benefits of this module

The Logic module allows young children to grasp logical concepts visually, and then to make use of those concepts to solve problems. It helps them begin to create the coherent mental framework they will use in later life to organise what they know effectively. They begin to develop the ability to think systematically about the world and to discover the principles by which they can organise and classify objects and events. They begin to ‘see’ those invisible attributes of objects and events which underpin an adult’s perception of an orderly world; a world in which objects are not separate or randomly linked but rather systematically connected by their inherent characteristics.

Overview 

The Logic module helps children develop the ability to analyse objects and events, see their ‘invisible’ sides, identify their most essential characteristics, think sequentially, draw conclusions, and classify and systematize information.

Using Grouping Circles, Classification Trees and Venn Diagrams, as well as substitute shapes to provide visual models of logical concepts, this module offers a distinctive approach to the introduction of two basic logical processes: classification and seriation. It provides an early, coherent introduction to these mental processes in a developmentally appropriate, entertaining and accessible manner.

 

Why are these skills important?

The mental processes required for logical thought are vital but children will not just develop them spontaneously. Adults have no difficulty in classifying, in ordering objects according to the degree to which they possess a given characteristic and in understanding the implications of sequences. For example, if experience or prior knowledge tells us that a train moves more slowly than a plane but faster than a car, then we know we can assume a plane moves faster than both a train and a car.

We make such connections and draw such conclusions so easily that we take the ability for granted. We do, but young children do not. They do not know that a general set must be bigger than the subsets included within it. Thus they may be able to tell us that tulips, roses and carnations are all flowers, and that wasps, bees and butterflies are all insects. But given a group containing many tulips and some roses they will probably not be able to answer the question, “Are there more flowers or more tulips?” They will see a lot of tulips, and say, “More tulips.” This is not just lack of knowledge. Even where children have the prerequisite knowledge, they are unlikely to be able to put it to use, because they have not yet created a coherent mental framework within which to organise what they know. They do not yet grasp even the most obvious features of a classification system.

 

How does this module work?

The Logic module offers a distinctive approach to the introduction of two elements of logical thinking: classification and seriation. What distinguishes the module is the introduction of simple Grouping Circles, Classification Trees and Venn Diagrams. Such diagrams, together with a variety of other visual prompts and external mediators, are used as visual models which help young children to ‘see’ logical concepts and connections without the need for many words. Activities in this module allow the children to analyse objects and events, to identify their essential characteristics and classify them, to think sequentially, and to draw conclusions.

 

The additional benefits of this module

The Logic module allows young children to grasp logical concepts visually, and then to make use of those concepts to solve problems. It helps them begin to create the coherent mental framework they will use in later life to organise what they know effectively. They begin to develop the ability to think systematically about the world and to discover the principles by which they can organise and classify objects and events. They begin to ‘see’ those invisible attributes of objects and events which underpin an adult’s perception of an orderly world; a world in which objects are not separate or randomly linked but rather systematically connected by their inherent characteristics.

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